An Afternoon with NYT Bestselling Author Eileen Dreyer

Welcome to Magical Musings, Eileen, it’s great to have you visit us today.

Thanks so much for the invitation.

 How did you get started writing?

There’s a great quote by Moliere. “Writing is like prostitution. First you do it for fun. Then you do it for a few close friends. Finally you do it for money.” That’s a pretty good outline of my own journey. I actually remember the moment I began to write. I was a Nancy Drew fanatic. Loved me my girl sleuth and her red roadster.

Then the day came when I realized I had read every Nancy in the library. And the librarian informed me that (sob) there wouldn’t be another out for a year. Well, one of the truths about me is that I do not wait well. I was devastated. And then, just like in the movies, I had this sudden idea. “Wait. I can write my own. And I can make them turn out the way I want them to.” I was ten.

The next phase started in seventh grade when I realized that an easy way to make friends was to put classmates into stories of adventure and romance with famous heartthrobs. Every morning there was somebody waiting for me to find out what happened the night before. Pretty heady stuff.

I stayed that route for quite a few years, although I retreated to having most of the adventures myself. It wasn’t until I was married, a mother, and had been working as an ER nurse for ten years before I hit the next stage. I was standing out in the hospital parking lot with a friend saying something like, “There’s got to be something better than this.” She was as big a reader as I was. She loved to write. She said, “I think we need to publish books.” And after about five years of slogging through the boggy land of publishing, I saw my first book published.

What genre(s) do you write in and why?

If I had enough time (and focus. I’m the queen of ADD) I would write in most genres, because I read most genres, and you tend to write what you read. What has ended up happening, though, is that I’ve focused on romance and suspense I think it’s because both genres reinforce messages I like, romance the message of hope and suspense of justice.

The truth is that I began writing romance without actually understanding it completely. What I did know, however, was that the heroines were strong women who always won in the end. And that in the end, no matter what had happened during the course of the book, everything would be okay. When I started trying to get published, I was working as a trauma nurse. Kind of stressful. I realized much later that all the while I worked ER, I only wrote romances. I think it was because there were days that it was the only way I could make good things happen to good people.

After I retired I included suspense(amazingly enough, all set in medicine). I could go someplace darker then, and tell some truths about the world of medicine I couldn’t before. And I could reinforce again and again, at least for me, that there was justice in the world. That the people I took care of who did terrible things would be punished and the innocent rewarded. As I said, the world I worked in was, at best, uncertain. This helped me believe that the world could remain rightside up.

The best of both worlds, of course, is when I can have romance and suspense. I get to enjoy a mix of both.

 Has your muse always known what genre you would write and be published in?

Ya know, I guess I didn’t realize this before now, but actually, yes. The funny thing is that I never read romance growing up. Not Heyer or Cartland, and I thought most Harlequins were silly. I came up what I call the mystery/suspense pathway. Nancy Drew, Mary Stuart, Helen McInnes, Alistair Maclean, Robert Ludlum. I’ve always said that it was my friend Katie who gave me the idea to write romance. After all, she was an avid reader. I insisted I wanted to write suspense, history, fantasy.

What I never paid attention to is that all along what I wrote for myself was actually what I’d label romantic adventure. Couples in terrible danger. Sexual tension(although I didn’t actually call it that when I was young). Happy endings. (Although I was much more a serial writer. Maybe I should have been a soaps writer). But yes, in the end, I’ve actually been focused in this direction since I was ten.      

What is your favorite part of writing?

Ooh, several things. That first inspiration. The moment you see something, or read something or hear something, and suddenly your brain goes, “What if….?” and sometimes within minutes characters and places and ideas are whirling around in your head. At that moment the book is almost a tangible thing you can hold in your hand.

Being caught up in the story, where the world you’ve created becomes the one that surrounds you. Dishes disappear and bills and that spat you had with your husband the night before. You’re actually running through Europe with a European prince trying to save the heir to the throne. You’re not in sweats, but an elegant gown as you stroll through the formal gardens of a castle, or breaking and entering attire as you sneak through a house. I admit it. Pretending for a living is a lot of fun.

What is your least favorite part of writing? 

The long, hard, frustrating days when it seems the story is holding itself just out of your reach, when your characters won’t tell you why they’re really doing what they’re doing, when the plot just won’t come together(I have most problem with that. You’d think somebody who wanted to be a suspense writer would love plot. Nah.). I actually have an old ratty robe just for days like that so my family knows the book isn’t going well and that they should extend the safety perimeter.

Give us an elevator pitch of your book.

Everybody knows Jake Kendall. Jake is a success story. Orphaned early, he did such a good job turning around a failing Wyoming horse ranch, he put his three siblings through school and gained a nationwide reputation.

Amanda Marlow is the epitome of an east coast author: bright, funny, curious. When she shows up at a cabin on Jake’s land to research a book, she threatens Jake’s entire world. She represents everything he longs for: freedom, exploration, learning. But Jake has a secret that could bring his entire life tumbling down. And if he lets Amanda close, she could expose it.

Excerpt from JAKE’S WAY (The Wounded Hero Collection)

“This is private property,” Jake taunted, knowing damn well that his voice was too harsh. He couldn’t help it. His hands shook. His belly was on fire. He wanted her so badly that if he weren’t careful, he’d take her right there in the doorway.

She smiled, and he was lost. “I know,” she answered. “I figured I’d negotiate with the owner to stay just a little while longer.”

“Negotiate?”

Amanda stepped forward. “Yes,” she answered, her voice slowing, thickening like warm honey. “I thought we could talk a little, and maybe share something to drink.”

Jake managed to raise an eyebrow. “Are you talking bribes here, woman?”

Her smile widened, and her eyes darkened. “If that’s what you want to call it.”

 

eileendreyer_jakesway_200pxJake’s Way

Everybody knows Jake Kendall. Jake is a success story. Orphaned early, he did such a good job turning around a failing Wyoming horse ranch, he put his three siblings through school and gained a nationwide reputation.

Amanda Marlow is the epitome of an east coast author: bright, funny, curious. When she shows up at a cabin on Jake’s land to research a book, she threatens Jake’s entire world. She represents everything he longs for: freedom, exploration, learning. But Jake has a secret that could bring his entire life tumbling down. And if he lets Amanda close, she could expose it.

“A beautifully compelling story of love”  Rendezvous

Available for Pre-Order on Amazon now, available 10/6/16! https://goo.gl/cckwvO

edreyerbvbook-copyAbout Eileen Dreyer

New York Times Bestselling, award-winning author Eileen Dreyer has published 40 novels and 10 short stories under her name and that of her evil twin, Kathleen Korbel in contemporary romance, paranormal romance, historical romance, romantic suspense, mystery and medical forensic suspense. A proud member of RWA’s Hall of FAME, she also has numerous awards from RT BookLovers and an Anthony nomination for mystery. She is now focusing on what she calls historic romantic adventure in her DRAKE’S RAKES series. A native of St. Louis, she still lives there with her family. She has animals but refuses to subject them to the limelight.

http://eileendreyer.com/

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One Response to An Afternoon with NYT Bestselling Author Eileen Dreyer

  1. Edie Ramer says:

    Eileen, I’ve been reading your books for a long time. I have the same problems with plotting. And my books could be ‘romantic adventure’ too. I wish we could use that as a category.

    I love your excerpt, and I’m wondering what Jake’s secret is! I’m going to hop over to Amazon and pre-order.

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